OUR OUTPUT




Research Network

2016

Journal impact factor (2014)

JCEM was ranked thirteenth out of 121 journals in the Endocrinology and Metabolism subject category in 2014.

Open access?

Access requires individual or institutional subscription.

Conference abstract
Determinants of non-adherence to adjuvant endocrine treatment in women with early stage breast cancer
ESMO Asia Congress, Singapore, 16-19 Dec, 2016

Dr. Wulaningsih is investigating why some breast cancer patients do not adhere to adjuvant endocrine treatment. Preliminary findings from this research were presented as a proffered paper at the ESMO Asia Congress. This work was a collaboration with King's College London, Uppsala-Örebro Regional Cancer Center, and Karolinska Institutet. Read the press release of this abstract here .

Conference abstract
Circulating prostate-specific antigen and telomere length in a nationally representative sample of men without prostate cancer
ESMO Asia Congress, Singapore, 16-19 Dec, 2016

Our work on the link between prostate-specific antigen and leukocyte telomere length was presented as a poster at the second ESMO Asia Congress organised by the European Society for Medical Oncology.

Journal impact factor (2014)

Aging was ranked thirty-fourth out of 184 journals in the Cell Biology subject category in 2014.

Open access?

Online access available free of charge.

Conference abstract
Life course adiposity and biological ageing: A cross-sectional study
Public Health Science Conference, Cardiff, 25 Nov, 2016

We investigated whether current and retrospective adiposity correlated with telomere length in American populations. Final results of this work and preliminary data from a follow-up study conducted at University College London were presented as a poster at the fifth Public Health Science Conference organised by The Lancet. Abstract is available in the special issue of the journal .

Journal impact factor (2014)

Obesity was ranked fifteenth out of 77 journals in the Dietetics and Nutrition subject category in 2014.

Open access?

Access requires individual or institutional subscription.

Conference abstract
A study of life course adiposity and leukocyte telomere length in a nationally representative population
The UK Congress on Obesity, 19-20 Sept, 2016

Obesity may induce inflammation which may influence cellular ageing. We studied the association of adiposity and its lifelong changes with a marker of biological ageing, telomere length. Early results of this work were presented at a national conference organised by The UK Association for the study of Obesity.

Conference abstract
Variation at the breast cancer susceptibility marker, rs4245739, is associated with differential miRNA binding and MDM4 expression
The 2nd Trans-Academic Cancer Genetics (TACG) Symposium & Workshop, Yogyakarta, 19-21 Aug, 2016

We used microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles to better understand breast cancer outcomes. Early results of this work were presented as a poster by Dr Sumadi Lukman Anwar, PhD at a conference organised by Universitas Gadjah Mada and the Indonesian Association of Oncology Surgeon (PERABOI).

Dr Lukman is a lecturer and trainee oncology surgeon at Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia who completed a PhD at the University of Hannover, Germany, and is an active contributor to PILAR.

Journal impact factor (2014)

The Prostate was ranked thirteenth out of 78 journals in the Urology/Nephrology subject category in 2014.

Open access?

Access requires individual or institutional subscription.

Journal impact factor (2014)

Oncotarget was ranked twenty-first out of 211 journals in the Oncology subject category in 2014.

Open access?

Online access available free of charge.



Journal impact factor (2014)

The Lancet was ranked second out of 153 journals in the Medicine, General & Internal subject category in 2014.

Open access?

Access requires individual or institutional subscription.


Journal impact factor (2014)

The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was ranked thirteenth out of 153 journals in the Medicine, General & Internal subject category in 2014.

Open access?

Online access available free of charge.


Advocacy

2016

Precision medicine: molecules and patients
In 1902, a British physician, Sir Archibald Garrod, published a paper in which he suggested that variability between humans occurred at the chemical (what we would now call ‘genotypic’ or ‘molecular’) level, and that this variability was an important factor in influencing how diseases manifest differently in different people. Garrod’s diagnostic investigations, based on individual patients’ particular chemical make-ups, went beyond the outward (phenotypic) signs, symptoms, and basic observations about environment and family history (not to mention superstitions) that characterised much of medicine. As such, these personalised, molecular-level observations came to embody the first important steps in the development of precision medicine...

Profile and impact
Recognition in a researcher’s own international community – whether the community be cancer researchers or software engineers and whether they be peers or senior figures – allows a researcher to build a reputation that affords him the opportunity to widen and deepen the impact of his work. Research collaboration across borders facilitates such recognition, leading to opportunities to undertake visiting research placements as well as attend conferences and present research work. In this respect, conferences – as in most fields, whether in science or business – are an important incubator of ideas and opportunities. Nevertheless, it is publications that are the bread and butter of science. Peer-reviewed publications build profile and widen impact. It is an imperfect system, with valid criticisms of the peer review process and the perverse incentives that arise from the inappropriate use of impact factors. However, for a researcher’s work to have impact, it is necessary to navigate this system, all the while avoiding the pitfalls made by others...

Identifying gaps in a system
Building the capacity and capability to undertake original scientific research of consequence is challenging. The obstacles to developing this capacity encompass those that relate to human capital, financial capital, and infrastructure. On the other hand, building a national research system unburdened by the legacy of past mistakes or inadequacies affords the opportunity to design frameworks that learn from errors made elsewhere and adapt accordingly...

Why do research? The social impact
MIMS Doctor, July 2016 issue.

The pathway to application
There are many reasons for doing research. In a previous article, one of these, enrichment of education and training, was discussed (Why do research? Learning by researching, MIMS Doctor, June 2016). Related motivations include research forming part of an individual’s career plan; research for its own sake, ie, for curiosity or knowledge generation; and research applied primarily for the solution of particular real-world problems or demands...

Why do research? Learning by researching
MIMS Doctor, June 2016 issue.

Heuristics-based medicine
Learning about and practising medicine is complicated by the inherent messiness of biology. The engineering student presented with two pieces of aluminum cable of the same purity, diameter and length may treat them exactly the same. The medical student presented with two patients of the same age, sex, height and weight among other characteristics often has no such luxury...

Education and outreach

2017

City and Islington Academy Career Fair
London, 27 January 2017.

As part of the UK STEM Ambassador scheme, we participated in the City and Islington Academy (CANDI) Career Fair. We had a great time sharing our experience and gauging interest in medical research among inquisitive College students. Among 25 students who provided feedback, 92% found the information to be very helpful, and in average they considered research to be very important for public health (93 out of 100 scale). Although only less than a third had experience conducting or assisting research, over half of the students would consider a career in research as an option. Thank you StemNet and CANDI for the amazing event and opportunity.